Components of the 1041 Permit

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Since 2016, Northern Water has been working with Larimer County on an intergovernmental agreement (IGA) for the Northern Integrated Supply Project (NISP). While all of the work in support of this IGA has been performed in accordance with Larimer County’s 1041 permit requirements, Larimer County and the NISP team have received questions from the public as to the adequacy of an IGA compared to the requirements of the 1041 permit. In order to put the question to rest and pursue a more straightforward permit, Northern Water is electing to pursue a traditional 1041 permit rather than a 1041 IGA. The 1041 review was created by the Colorado General Assembly to allow local governments, such as Larimer County, to review local impacts from projects of statewide concern.

By migrating the current cooperative work between Northern Water and Larimer County to the 1041 permit process, it will allow the formal process identified in county code to take place: Submission of applications for the pipeline conveyance and recreation opportunities, opportunities for public input to the Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners, and then action from the County Commissioners.

As part of the 1041 permit, two components of the Northern Integrated Supply Project (NISP) are being reviewed. These include:

  1. Pipelines routes through Larimer County
  2. Glade Reservoir including proposed recreational facilities

The other project components, their environmental effects and proposed mitigation of those impacts are being analyzed and permitted through additional federal and state regulatory processes outside of the 1041 permit as described in the permitting and mitigation attachment and timeline. Those processes include multiple public engagement and comment periods to gain feedback on the project as a whole. Northern Water has also completed additional outreach on the project as described in the NISP Public Engagement History Memo.

The review of these two components and the development of the associated 1041 permit is being prepared consistent with Larimer County Land Use Code requirements.

Since 2016, Northern Water has been working with Larimer County on an intergovernmental agreement (IGA) for the Northern Integrated Supply Project (NISP). While all of the work in support of this IGA has been performed in accordance with Larimer County’s 1041 permit requirements, Larimer County and the NISP team have received questions from the public as to the adequacy of an IGA compared to the requirements of the 1041 permit. In order to put the question to rest and pursue a more straightforward permit, Northern Water is electing to pursue a traditional 1041 permit rather than a 1041 IGA. The 1041 review was created by the Colorado General Assembly to allow local governments, such as Larimer County, to review local impacts from projects of statewide concern.

By migrating the current cooperative work between Northern Water and Larimer County to the 1041 permit process, it will allow the formal process identified in county code to take place: Submission of applications for the pipeline conveyance and recreation opportunities, opportunities for public input to the Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners, and then action from the County Commissioners.

As part of the 1041 permit, two components of the Northern Integrated Supply Project (NISP) are being reviewed. These include:

  1. Pipelines routes through Larimer County
  2. Glade Reservoir including proposed recreational facilities

The other project components, their environmental effects and proposed mitigation of those impacts are being analyzed and permitted through additional federal and state regulatory processes outside of the 1041 permit as described in the permitting and mitigation attachment and timeline. Those processes include multiple public engagement and comment periods to gain feedback on the project as a whole. Northern Water has also completed additional outreach on the project as described in the NISP Public Engagement History Memo.

The review of these two components and the development of the associated 1041 permit is being prepared consistent with Larimer County Land Use Code requirements.


Do you have a question regarding the 1041 permit with Larimer County?

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    If the Larimer county commissioners can not agree on a pipeline route or other aspects of this project would the Army Corps of engineers have the final say so ?

    Fact from Fiction Asked 3 months ago

    Different aspects of the NISP project have been permitted or are being permitted at Federal, State and local levels. Following several public hearings, the State approved a Fish and Wildlife Mitigation and Enhancement Plan. Similarly, the Corps of Engineers will be making its Clean Water Act section 404 permit decision pursuant to its standards and based on information in the record for the project components, alignment and locations including the pipeline.  To proceed with construction, NISP will require applicable local permits.  In particular, and pursuant to Colorado statute section 24-65.1-101, et seq., Larimer County has enacted regulations for designated “areas and activities of state interest,” commonly referred to as a County “1041” permit.  By law and per Larimer County’s Land Use Code, the Board of County Commissioners, after staff recommendations and public input, shall take action on matters within the scope of its permitting authority (including, but not limited to, NISP pipelines) within 60 days of receipt of a complete application.  

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    Just curious but when Nisp talks about the estimated number of visitors per year (percentage ), how many of those visitors would be driving by glade on their way to other recreational activities in Co or Wy anyway ?

    Fact from Fiction Asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  The number of recreation users who choose Glade Reservoir as a destination has been estimated using standard and commonly accepted traffic engineering methodologies. We don’t know how many visitors will also travel to other regional recreation facilities. However, the Glade Reservoir recreation area will work in concert with those other areas to meet the need to provide additional recreation space to offset consistently expanding recreation demand identified in the Larimer County Reservoir Parks Master Plan (LCRPMP) and Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP).  As described in LCRPMP, “as populations in Larimer County and the region increase, and with most of the recreation areas built out, there will be continued challenges with crowding both on water and land.”  This new facility will also address demand management issues “in which land managers are struggling with basic upkeep of the areas and structures they oversee while at the same time, lacking the capacity to handle increasing public demand.” as identified in the SCORP.

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    Once the project is completed and open for recreation will there be some sort of full time staff at the facility that has camping / boating etc ? Will there be someone in the evenings also ? Will access be allowed to the facility 24 hrs a day or will there be a closing time ?

    Fact from Fiction Asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  Yes, Larimer County will manage the Glade recreation area and have full-time staff assigned to this facility.  It’s anticipated that many portions of the facility will be open to day use only, and operating hours for those areas are anticipated to be from dawn to dusk similar to some other Larimer County recreation areas.

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    Could you provide a complete list of all the sources of water for the Glade project including the volume of water that was agreed to be provided, the entity that approved the sale, exchange or transfer of that water, and the date it was approved? If there are any deficiencies in the water needed for NISP could you provide a detailed list of how these deficiencies will be satisfied?

    FCResident Asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  A list and description of the water supplies associated with the Northern Integrated Supply Project can be found in Section 2.6.2 of the Final Environmental Impact Statement linked here for your ease of reference.

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    My biggest question would be, Why? Why do these communities need this amount of water in the future? Why can't water conservation be enough to supply these demands? Why do these communities need to grow their populations to this level? Why is growth prioritized over environmental needs? There are certainly easier, less costly, less controversial ways to supply water to these growing communities. Why aren't those other options being looked at?

    poudre1 Asked 10 months ago

    Thanks for reaching out to us.  To answer your questions, the NISP project participants anticipate that their communities will grow in the future, which will require the development of additional water supplies.  The NISP project will supply a portion of those future water needs.

    The NISP participants are motivated to implement and have implemented water conservation measures.  The Participants have reduced use by nearly 30% by implementing water-saving measures such as public education, watering restrictions, low-flow fixture requirements, and landscaping regulations for new construction.  All of the NISP participants have water conservation plans. These conservation efforts, however, will not supply enough water to meet all future needs. 

    A Draft, Supplemental Draft, and Final Environmental Impact Statement have been developed for the project over the past 15 years of study, which analyze the environmental impacts of the NISP project and alternatives to that project.  The details and conclusions of those analyses can be found at the following link: NISP Environmental Impact Statement


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    what is the planned start date for this project and is there any possibility it can be moved to an earlier date?

    Joseybonner Asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question! The planned start date for the construction of the project is in approximately 2023. Northern Water has been going through an extensive permitting process with federal, state, and local entities. After the permitting processes are complete, final land acquisition and design will be done to get ready for construction in 2023. Learn more about the overall NISP project at www.gladereservoir.org

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    I must be the first person to log into this site. I don't see any other comments. No discussion? Seems like one of those black holes that meet legal requirements but prevent anyone else from seeing the feedback. "Why must I register?" That's a good question too. All that's actually required is a functioning email address. That doesn't really enforce accountability. I'm somewhat skeptical of this site. It looks like it's put here as self-service and not an actual community forum. LOL! Like we don't all know that. Anyway, I stand to make a ton of extra money when the site completes, so carry on.

    ipachip Asked about 1 year ago
    Thank you for your question! This project site was just launched on June 28, 2019, so we appreciate you registering and being one of the first to ask questions. All feedback received on this site will be reviewed by Northern Water and Larimer County as part of the public record on the project. Please visit https://www.nisptalk.com/about-the-nisptalk-site to learn more about why we ask you to register to provide feedback. 


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    What actions can be taken by local residents to stop the approval of this 1041 permit and prevent the building of Glade Reservoir and/or the pipelines from the reservoir, in order to keep this water in its natural watershed where it belongs?

    LD970 Asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. NISP is strongly committed to conducting public outreach to receive feedback to make the project stronger and more comprehensive.  That feedback, along with acquisition of required permits and certifications, will enable us to move forward with a well vetted and comprehensive project. If you would like to see an analysis of the need for the project, as well as the alternatives that were explored as part of the federal permitting process, please see the Final Environmental Impact Statement, located here: https://www.nwo.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory-Program/Colorado/EIS-NISP/

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    How long have the towns and water districts behind this project been planning to use NISP to meet their needs. If NISP is not approved, how will these towns and water districts meet their needs?

    OGD123 Asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. If NISP is not approved, the towns and water districts participating in this project (the Project Participants) would acquire water by buying existing farms from the Poudre River and Big Thompson River basins and transferring those farms water supplies from agricultural use to municipal and industrial use.  This is commonly referred to as buy-and-dry.  As described in the project Final Environmental Impact Statement64,200 acres of irrigated farmland would be dried up in this process.  The Project Participants have been completing the federal permitting associated with NISP since 2004.

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    In one of your question comments, you cite that town and water districts would have to 'buy and dry' approximately 64,200 acres of irrigated farmland if NISP is not approved. This is false in that there are other alternatives to consider. Additionally, isn't it true that, in order to secure permitting for this project, NISP will have to 'buy and dry' 100 or more farms (potentially totaling more than 40,000 acres or irrigated farmland) to tie up 25,000 acre-feet of water they don't currently have rights to?

    LD970 Asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  In response, other no-action alternatives were studied and are either not feasible or not able to provide the amount of firm yield needed for NISP participants. Several aspects of this question suggest a misunderstanding of the NISP operations that will involve substitutions of water from Galeton Reservoir and exchanges to Glade Reservoir, and of the WaterSecure program that is a companion to those operations. NISP will collaborate with the New Cache la Poudre and Larimer & Weld irrigation companies in Weld County to provide water from Galeton Reservoir to these companies in much the same way those companies already use existing reservoirs to provide water to their shareholders directly or by exchange. NISP will then exchange water from the Company headgates up the Poudre River to Glade Reservoir.


    First, and most importantly, the substitutions and exchanges do not require farms to be dried up. Rather NISP will encourage farms to remain under irrigation so that NISP can deliver substitution water to the New Cache and Larimer & Weld canals for irrigation—the opposite of “buy and dry.” Second, NISP will not have to buy any farms to secure permitting for this project, and NISP does not need to buy farms to “tie up 25,000 acre-feet of water.” The water supply for the substitutions will come from the new Galeton Reservoir, which already has decreed water rights. The exchanges will be made in cooperation with the New Cache and Larimer & Weld companies. There are currently over 80,000 acres being irrigated under these two systems. Should the amount of irrigated acreage decrease dramatically, however, because of pressure from development or “buy and dry” practices by other entities, the NISP substitutions and exchanges could be affected.


    That’s where the WaterSecure efforts come into play. To avoid water permanently leaving farms through other entities’ buy-and-dry purchases, Northern Water and the NISP participants are willing to buy land and water from willing sellers in the two ditch systems, and explore various avenues to keep the water on the farms so those supplies remain available for the NISP exchanges. Rather than “buy-and-dry,” this is an outside-the-box, “buy-and-supply” approach to address tightening water supplies.